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Date: Wednesday, July 30, 1958
Place: Yugoslavia, Trieste, Italy
Weather: Hot

Travel AYA and see Europe by bus! Had breakfast in Austria, lunch in Yugoslavia, and dinner in Italy.

When we got to the border we had to tell how much money we had, and declare our cameras – almost had to sign our lives away. You could tell the people in Yugoslavia aren’t used to tourists ’cause they really stared at our bus. After lunch we went to visit a castle where we saw some darling children, and then on the way to the caves we picked up these two students who wanted a ride. This one was just a doll and he had the most beautiful eyes I’ve ever seen. When he winked at me, I almost burned up my exit card! Those caves were really something – this one is the largest in Europe, and the third largest in the world. (Carlsbad and Mammoth in the States are the largest). We rode through them in electric cars, and walked around too – it was 47° and sure felt good.

When we crossed the Italian border this little guard that spoke French hopped on the bus to talk to us. I just love Italy. The boys are really flirts and I can see why you have to be careful. For dinner at this restaurant we all ordered dry red wine and had huge bowls of spaghetti. As if this wasn’t all we had a delicious tossed salad, and a plate of cold meat! Walked around a little, and then Jan and I came back to go to bed!


Trieste is a city located in northeastern Italy. It is one of Europe’s most important seaports for the coffee trade, bringing in more than 40% of Italy’s own supply.

Within the Province of Trieste can be found the once-largest tourist cave in the world – Grotta Gigante (the record was broken in 2010). The cave was first explored in 1840 by Antonio Federico Lindner, who was searching for underground water to be used by the city’s pipeline. In 1897, it was further explored and mapped by Andrea Perko. By 1908, the cave was open for public guided tours.

Grotta Gigante

Grotta Gigante. Image courtesy of Björn Groß via a Creative Commons license.



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