Share this:

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinteresttumblr

Date: Saturday, August 16, 1958
Place: Paris
Weather: Sort of cool

Shopping this morning – first to buy perfume (My Sin – $6.51, and Arpege – $9.58) and then Judy S., Jan and I went to Christian’s where I got ties for Dad ($6.30) and Bill ($5.60). After that I got some gloves by Christian Dior,blue kid for me and pink suede for Mom, really neat ($11.50 for both). We had lunch ($2.00) at a sidewalk cafe – steak, french fries and melon!

I didn’t go with the group to Versailles ’cause I didn’t care to see it again so John and I took off by tube to the Flea Market. It surely is something to see! Rows upon rows of tiny stalls selling everything from furniture, and antiques to tooth-paste and heels for shoes! We walked around looking at everything for three hours! John helped me pick out four water colors of Paris ($4.00), and after having a snack we took the tube back home.

Christian came in while I was eating supper to tell me that we would go but at 9:00 instead of 8:00 ’cause he was going home to eat. He really is sweet. I can see why American girls seldom marry foreign boys – plenty of charm but no money!

We went to a movie and saw And Kings Go Forth (F. Sinatra, T. Curtis, N. Wood). The action took place in France during the war – lots of familiar scenery. I won’t see Christian again ’cause he’s going away tomorrow. C’est la vie!

(My reservation was confirmed so I can go home Monday!)


The Château de Versailles began its life as a hunting lodge for Louis XIII. His son, Louis XIV, began the transformation of the property into the grand structure it is today. From then on, the palace was the main residence of the French monarchy until Louis XVI. France’s court and government were moved from Paris to Versailles in 1682. This did not last long – the royal family was forced to return to Paris in 1789 after the start of the French Revolution.

Many architects, landscape designers, artists, and decorators worked on the expansion of the palace and its grounds. One of the most well-known and impressive rooms at Versailles is the Hall of Mirrors where many extravagant parties were held. It is also the place where in 1919, the Treaty of Versailles was signed, thus ending World War I.

Versailles currently serves as the Museum of the History of France, although political functions do still take place there, such as hosting joint sessions of the French legislature.



Follow Judy:

Facebooktwitter