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Date: Wednesday, June 18, 1958
Place: Arosa Sky and London
Weather: Sunny and quite warm

Last night no one could sleep so we all got up at 2:30 am and set around on the top bunks having a chocolate party which consisted of stuffing ourselves with Sue’s box of Swiss chocolates! We were up at 7:00 for breakfast and were supposed to arrive at Plymouth at 10:00, but we were two hours late. So Dietrich and Gunter, our German waiters, were surprised to see us at lunch. We turned in our landing cards on ship, and boarded another ship which took us into Plymouth (the same place the Pilgrims started from, only it took them 54 days).

We took a train to London (took 5 hours) and were awfully impressed with the scenery. We saw the white chalk horse carved in the hillside. and everyone had high tea on the train which was a regular meal.

We had just gotten off the train and were getting our luggage when Alan came up. Was I surprised. He drove back to our hotel, The Royal, in his Morris, and waited while I checked in.

 Morris Minor 1000

1958 Morris Minor 1000 2-door Saloon. Image courtesy of Lars-Göran Lindgren via a Creative Commons license.

We went to a coffee shop called Bunjie’s, which was very Bohemian, and everyone sat around wooden benches at wooden tables. After that we walked around London holding hands! Alan is really nice! Got a letter from mom. (Bed at 2:15.)


Bunjies Coffee House and Folk Cellar, allegedly named after a pet hamster, was located just off Charing Cross Road at 27 Litchfield Street, WC2. The 400-year-old former wine cellar provided a performing space where diverse forms of alternative entertainment could be enjoyed six nights a week.

Bunjies was one of the original folk cafes of the 1950s and a regular haunt of writers, singers, comedians, and cartoonists – included in its roster of performers were Bob Dylan, Paul Simon, Phil Collins, and David Bowie. It remained an influential music venue until its closure in 1999.


The white chalk horse that Judy is referring to is one of the eight visible chalk carvings in Wiltshire in the UK. Some of the horses date back 250 years.



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